Industrial Biotechnology Alliance

The Industrial Biotechnology Alliance (IBA) is an engine for research on the Park. Its mission is to address the major societal and environmental challenges of the 21st century through the discovery and development of biological resources for producing and processing materials, chemicals and energy using plants and microbes as factories.

iba-logo

About the Industrial Biotechnology Alliance

Industrial biotechnology offers novel greener solutions to manufacturing, so reducing reliance on fossil fuels. The mission of the Industrial Biotechnology Alliance (IBA) is to build on the multi-disciplinary research, scientific excellence and critical mass across the Norwich Research Park (NRP) to address major societal and environmental challenges of the 21st century through the discovery and development of biological resources for producing and processing materials, chemicals and energy, using plants and microbes as factories. IBA supports integration and synergy of research teams across the NRP through scientific meetings, workshops, NRP-funded pump-priming projects and cross-NRP studentships. IBA also works with the NRP partners on building strategic interactions with funding agencies, stakeholders, and industry.

Our research

Major research themes within IBA:

Novel anti-infective therapies and strategies
High value products from plants

IBA embraces and supports research in all areas of industrial biotechnology across the NRP, and researchers with suggestions or proposals for workshops and/or new areas of activity are encouraged to contact anne.osbourn@jic.ac.uk to discuss.

IBA Research Fellowships
IBA is seeking to attract the next generation of scientists to contribute to our world-class research. IBA supports outstanding individuals in their applications for Independent Research Fellowships (e.g. BBSRC, NERC, Marie Sklodowska-Curie, ERC, Leverhulme Trust) with the backing of our globally-renowned research institutions. Candidates who have research interests that fall broadly into the two key research themes of IBA (see above) or into the new theme ‘Decoding and Recoding Biological Systems’ (currently under development) are invited to apply for our support. Key senior scientists at the NRP can help develop and enhance your Fellowship proposal, discuss your future research plans and provide expert advice on writing your Fellowship application whilst facilitating the potential to forge new collaborations.

If you are considering applying for a Fellowship in one of the IBA themes then please contact us: anne.osbourn@jic.ac.uk

Facilities and Resources

Management


Prof Anne Osbourn

Prof Anne Osbourn

Director
anne.osbourn@jic.ac.uk
01603 450407

Prof Keith Waldron

Prof Keith Waldron

Deputy Director
keith.waldron@ifr.ac.uk
01603 255385


Administration:

Dr Matthew Hills

matthew.hills@norwichresearchpark.com
01603 255158

Helen Ghirardello

helen.ghirardello@jic.ac.uk
01603 450581

Theme Leaders


Barrie Wilkinson

Barrie Wilkinson

Novel anti-infective therapies and strategies
barrie.wilkinson@jic.ac.uk
01603 450991

Matt Hutchings

Matt Hutchings

Novel anti-infective therapies and strategies
m.hutchings@uea.ac.uk
01603 592257

Justin O’Grady

Justin O’Grady

Novel anti-infective therapies and strategies
[name@domain.ext]
[number]

Lindsay Hall

Lindsay Hall

Novel anti-infective therapies and strategies
lindsay.hall@ifr.ac.uk
01603 255167


Sarah O’Connor

Sarah O’Connor

High value products from plants
sarah.oconnor@jic.ac.uk
01603 450334

Maria O’Connell

Maria O’Connell

High value products from plants
m.oconnell@uea.ac.uk
01603 592030

George Lomonossoff

George Lomonossoff

High value products from plants
george.lomonossoff@jic.ac.uk
01603 450531

 

Rob Field

Rob Field

Carbohydrate research
rob.field@jic.ac.uk
01603 450720

 
 
 

Scientific Advisory Board


Prof Tim Donohue

Prof Tim Donohue

Prof Raoul Bino

Prof Raoul Bino

Dr Mike Dawson

Dr Mike Dawson

 

Name Affiliation Research interests
Mike Ambrose John Innes Centre Manages the Germplasm Resources Unit (GRU) and its development as a National Capability supported by the BBSRC. This centres around the long term curation and distribution of strategically important germplasm for a range of crops, associated wild relatives and specialist genetic stocks and their utilisation by the wider bioscience community and related industries.
Mark Banfield John Innes Centre Structural biology; cell adhesion; host pathogen interactions.
Joszef Baranyi Institute of Food Research Modelling of survival and growth of microbes, especially in dynamic and stress environments and working on both deterministic and stochastic models of microbial kinetics. Lately, modelling bacterial adaptation, applying systems biology and network science methods.
Ian Bedford John Innes Centre John Innes Centre Entomology Facility.
Sean Bew University of East Anglia The development and application of synthetic organic chemistry for the formation of new and unusual chemical entities.
Merv Bibb John Innes Centre Understanding antibiotic production and its regulation in actinomycetes, the major source of clinically useful antibiotics.
Tharin Blumenschein University of East Anglia Understanding protein structures and dynamics, and their role in protein interactions and function.
Stephen Bornemann John Innes Centre Alpha-glucans in microbes and plants; plant-microbe symbioses .
Richard Bowater University of East Anglia DNA repair processes, mechanisms that influence genome stability.
Julea Butt University of East Anglia Research elucidates properties of electron transfer proteins relevant to their roles within living organisms. Present research is inspired by the role of electricity, a flow of electrons, in living organisms.
Mark Buttner John Innes Centre The cell biological processes underpinning Streptomyces sporulation, the master regulators that control these processes, and the regulatory networks that link the two.
Aedin Cassidy University of East Anglia Bioactive compounds present in plants, with interest in their metabolism, bioavailability and health effects, using a combination of cell/in vitro models and human studies.
Ian Charles Institute of Food Research
Ian Clark University of East Anglia The impact of bioactive molecules derived from the diet on cartilage metabolism and osteoarthritis (ii) the role of microRNAs in chondrogenesis and osteoarthritis (iii) the role of proteases in Dupuytren’s disease.
Matt Clark The Earlham Institute Genomics, genetic, molecular biology and technology background; development of new technologies and pipelines that provide unique capabilities within the UK through EI’s National Capability.
Enrico Coen John Innes Centre Highly integrative approach combining molecular, genetic, imaging, population, ecological and computational approaches to discover how small groups of cells in microscopic buds turn themselves into the diverse flower and leaf shapes we see around us.
Samir Dervisevic Norfolk & Norwich University Hospital Blood-borne virus infections, infections in immuno-compromised and emerging viral pathogens; clinical expertise in viral hepatitis; virus induced resistance mutations.
Jo Dicks Institute of Food Research National Collection of Yeast Cultures. Genome bioinformatician/Computational analysis studies.
Changjiang Dong University of East Anglia Antibiotic resistance and new targets.
Dylan Edwards University of East Anglia Novel cancer therapies, chemopreventive agents.
Ngozi Elumogo Norfolk & Norwich University Hospital Director of Infection Prevention and Control at the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust..
Rob Field John Innes Centre Developing and exploiting chemical tools and principles to address questions in plant and microbial carbohydrate metabolism. involve some combination of chemical and enzymatic synthesis, inhibitor design and assessment, biochemistry, structural biology, metabolomic, proteomic and transcriptomic analysis.
Alastair Forbes Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital
Michael Frenneaux University of East Anglia
Ganesan University of East Anglia Chemical biology, medicinal chemistry and organic synthesis, with an emphasis on biologically active natural products and epigenetics.
Andrew Gates University of East Anglia Genetics and biochemistry of assimilatory nitrate reduction, and nitrogen and iron respiratory systems in bacteria.
Anthony Hall The Earlham Institute Organisms and Ecosystems.
Lindsay Hall Institute of Food Research Early life bacterial groups, bifidobacteria and how these pioneer bifidobacteria colonise the gut (via their surface molecules) and subsequently modulate critical resistance to gut infection, and to understand how early life antibiotic-induced disturbances alter this microbial community, ultimately leading to a breakdown in pathogen protection.
Neil Hall John Innes Centre
Chris Hamilton University of East Anglia Synthetic chemistry, biotransformations, enzymology, biochemistry and molecular microbiology; design, synthesis and application of novel chemical tools to address complex biological/medicinal challenges.
Wendy Harwood John Innes Centre Head, Crop Transformation Group that develops and delivers efficient crop genetic modification and genome editing.
Brittany Hazard Institute of Food Research Joint Research Fellow at the Institute of Food Research and the John Innes Centre building strong connections between the field of plant breeding , to improve cereal grain quality for human health.
Andrew Hemmings University of East Anglia Use of structural, molecular and computational biology to study fundamental problems in mechanistic enzymology and molecular recognition.
Lesley Howell University of East Anglia Natural product analogues, drug design, proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), new antibacterial agents.
Matt Hutchings University of East Anglia Using a range of approaches to understand how antibiotic-producing actinomycete bacteria survive in complex environments, most notably the soil and on (and inside) eukaryotic host organisms; discovery of novel natural products from these bacteria which can be developed as antibiotics for clinical use; investigation of how these antibiotics are used in nature.
Nathalie Juge Institute of Food Research Molecular mechanisms underpinning gut bacteria-mucus interactions.
Gabriella Keleman University of East Anglia Development of Streptomyces coelicolor, a Gram-positive, filamentous bacterium.
Rob Kingsley Institute of Food Research Variation in genotype and phenotype of food-borne bacterial pathogens and their hosts.
David Lawson John Innes Centre Manages the Protein X-ray Crystallography Platform.
Nick Lebrun University of East Anglia Metal metabolism and toxicity in bacteria; O2 and stress sensing via metallo-regulators.
Richard Leggett University of East Anglia Modelling growth and development of microorganisms, image processing.
David Livermore University of East Anglia Surveillance of antibiotic resistance, investigation of emerging resistance types, in vitro evaluation of new antibiotics.
George Lomonossoff John Innes Centre The exploitation of plant viruses in bio- and nanotechnology technology.
Jake Malone John Innes Centre Molecular mechanisms underlying bacterial signal transduction during responses to the environment; investigation of Pseudomonas fluorescens (a prominent biocontrol species that forms non-specific, beneficial relationships with plants and suppresses fungal growth) and Pseudomonas syringae (an aggressive plant pathogen).
Cathie Martin John Innes Centre Co-ordinating research into the relationship between diet and health, and how crops can be fortified to improve diets and address the global challenge of escalating chronic disease.
Tony Maxwell John Innes Centre Investigation of the structure and mechanism of DNA topoisomerases and associated proteins, in order to further our understanding of key biological processes in which they are involved, and to harness this knowledge for the development of therapeutic agents, specifically antibiotics.
Ben Miller University of East Anglia Calcium signalling pathways and synthetic biology in plants, focusing on how plants use calcium as a second messenger to respond and adapt to the environment.
Anne-Marie Minihane University of East Anglia The independent and interactive impact of select dietary components (in particular n-3 fatty acids and flavonoids) and common gene variants on cardio-metabolic health.
Chris Morris University of East Anglia Experimental peptide therapeutics (including antimicrobial peptides), focussing specifically on their disposition at biological barriers.
Maria Munoz-Herranz University of East Anglia The development of novel and exciting chemistry of allenic systems, from acid to transition metal catalysis, to the understanding of interactions of allenes containing products in living systems and their application as drugs.
Michael Muller University of East Anglia Molecular nutrition related to lipid homeostasis, nutrigenomics and nutritional systems biology; molecular mechanisms underlying genome-wide effects of foods (specific bioactive components or nutrients) on immuno-metabolic health and plasticity.
Arjan Narbad Institute of Food Research Microbial ecology of the gut, probiotics, antimicrobials.
Maria O’Connell University of East Anglia New therapeutic targets in the resolution of inflammation, Nrf2TREM-2, natural products and analogues as anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative agents.
Sarah O’Conner John Innes Centre Plant natural product biosynthesis, metabolic engineering, anti-cancer agents.
Justin O’Grady University of East Anglia Microbial pathogen molecular diagnostics.
Giles Oldroyd John Innes Centre Beneficial micro-organisms to transfer the nitrogen-fixing capability from legumes to cereal crops. This has implications for global agriculture, but most interested in benefitting small-holder farmers in Sub-Saharan Africa.
Anne Osbourn John Innes Centre Plant-derived natural products – function, synthesis, mechanisms of metabolic diversification, bioengineering.
Nicola Patron The Earlham Institute Taking a synthetic biology approach to study the function of DNA sequences and developing bioengineering technologies.
Mike Peck Institute of Food Research Physiology and molecular biology of Clostridium botulinum and other foodborne pathogens; applying research findings, including developments in mathematical biology, such as risk assessment to issues faced by industry and regulators.
Steve Penfield John Innes Centre Environmental control of seed traits, seed dormancy and germination vigour.
Chris Pickett University of East Anglia The chemistry of the metallo-sulfur hydrogenase enzymes. These enzymes catalyse the reversible uptake/evolution of dihydrogen.
Steven Powell Leaf Systems Ltd The new Hypertrans technology will produce new high value products, including pharmaceuticals and vaccines, under contract for international research and development partners. The technology is already being used under license to manufacture flu vaccines for clinical trials in Canada and the US.
Sheng Qi University of East Anglia Behaviour of drug-polymer/lipid dispersions in solid (phase behaviour) and liquid (in biological fluids) states, and development of new approaches for stabilising supersaturated drug dispersions; enhancing drug absorption via tailoring the physical chemistry of formulations.
David J. Richardson University of East Anglia Investigation of respiratory processes of anaerobic bacteria from soils, marine environments and the human gastro-intestinal tract; isolation, structural characterisation and functional analysis of respiratory enzymes and electron transfer proteins; nitrogen cycle; mechanisms by which bacteria use insoluble extracellular minerals as respiratory electron acceptors.
Ian Roberts Institute of Food Research Manages research activities associated with the UK National Collection of Yeast Cultures (NCYC) and leading its development as a BBSRC ‘National Capability’, delivering authenticated strains and high quality characterisation data to yeast researchers worldwide.
Stephen Robinson University of East Anglia Improving existing angiogenic therapies.
Gary Rowley University of East Anglia Director, Wolfson Fermentation Suite. Use of genetics, functional genomics, infection models and chemostat culture systems to understand mechanisms of bacterial pathogenesis.
Amit Sacheva University of East Anglia Chemical biology, synthetic biology; genetic incorporation of structurally diverse non-natural amino acids into proteins; use of non-natural amino acids to create novel proteins that can be used in medicine.
Mark Searcey University of East Anglia Organic synthesis using solid and solution phase methodologies to generate structures of interest; development of routes to natural products in order to study structure-activity relationships; targets for the development of new therapeutics with a particular interest in targeting DNA and protein-proteins interactions. We are currently focussed on targeting protein-protein interactions and DNA targets in cancer and inflammation, alongside the synthesis of natural products targets such as simocyclinone.
Alison Smith John Innes Centre Primary metabolism in plants, particularly the metabolism of sucrose and starch. We aim to discover how plant growth and yield in different environments is coordinated with the assimilation and storage of carbon. Uses use biochemical, genetic and molecular biological techniques to study this question in Arabidopsis and in cereals.
Martin Stocks PBL Technology Ltd Business Manager, Health and Medical Technology portfolio of PBL.
Dan Swan The Earlham Institute Head, Platforms and Pipelines.
David Swarbreck The Earlham Institute Plant and microbial genomics.
Catherine Tremlett John Innes Centre Consultant microbiologist; antimicrobial resistance.
Andy Truman John Innes Centre Microbial natural products, bioactives, antibiotics.
John Wain University of East Anglia Use of new technologies in clinical and public health microbiology, in particular the development of sequence-based tools for molecular epidemiology and bacterial identification; longstanding interest in Salmonella.
Keith Waldron Institute of Food Research Director of the Biorefinery Centre at IFR. Development of biofuels and platform chemicals from agri-food chain.
Zoe Waller University of East Anglia Drug-nucleic acid interactions and studying alternative DNA structures, using She different experimental approaches including organic synthesis, biophysics and molecular biology.
Fred Warren Institute of Food Research How starch structure can be modified for improved nutritional outcomes as a food component.
Alastair Watson University of East Anglia Regulation of cell death in intestinal epithelial cells; translational medicine.
Anthony West The Earlham Institute Automation specialist, Platforms and Pipelines Group.
Grant Wheeler University of East Anglia Molecular events that govern the origin and migration of different cell types within the developing embryo, using the amphibian Xenopus laevis as a model system; chemical genetics; drug discovery.
Barrie Wilkinson John Innes Centre Microbial natural products; bioengineering for improved activity, selectivity and biophysical properties for application as pharmaceuticals and crop protection agents; investigation of the molecular targets of antibacterial natural products and the mechanisms by which they exert their biological activity.

NRP biotech spin-out Iceni Diagnostics wins Business Award

NRP based biotech company, Iceni Diagnostics, which is a spin-out from John Innes Centre and University of East Anglia has won a prestigious award that celebrates the best businesses in the region.
The long standing EDP Business Awards recognised the achievements of the Norwich Research Park based company with the Knowledge Catalyst award.
It was one [Continue reading»]

Landmark discovery turns marathon of evolution into a sprint

A research collaboration has discovered a new way of rapidly generating a swathe of medically significant natural products after discovering a ground-breaking technique that turns the marathon of evolution into a sprint.
The surprise discovery came when the research team inadvertently replicated a process that bacteria use to evolve their machinery for making natural products.[Continue reading»]

New study links antibiotic resistance to common household disinfectant triclosan

Scientists from the John Innes Centre, Quadrum Institute and the University of Birmingham have discovered a link between a major mechanism of antibiotic resistance and resistance to the disinfectant triclosan which is commonly found in domestic products.
Researchers made the unexpected finding that bacteria that mutated to become resistant to quinolone antibiotics also became more [Continue reading»]

Decoding and recoding biological systems

The past few years have seen unprecedented advances in DNA sequencing and synthesis technologies. These technologies, in combination with sophisticated new methods of analysis, have opened up unprecedented opportunities to recode organisms to produce new bio-products which may support advances in medicine, agriculture or industrial processes.
A research workshop titled ‘Decoding and Recoding Biological [Continue reading»]

Discovering new antibiotics from ants

Bacteria which live on the surface of leaf-cutter ants discovered in the tropics produce an exciting array of antibiotics. These antibiotics are new to science and have exciting properties not found previously – including the ability to kill bacteria which are otherwise now resistant to other anitbiotics. The breakthrough results from research of [Continue reading»]

Public join in hunt for new antibiotics in Thetford Forest soil

Visitors to High Lodge in Thetford Forest next week can join scientists from the University of East Anglia (UEA) who will be digging for clues in the race to solve the problem of antibiotic resistance, as part of the Microbiology Society’s ‘Antibiotics Unearthed’ project.
Antibiotics Unearthed is a crowd sourced science project, which members of [Continue reading»]

JIC spin-off Leaf Systems opened by Science Minister Jo Johnson

Leaf Systems International Ltd, a spin out company built on the world-leading UK bioscience research that takes place at the John Innes Centre, was today officially opened by Jo Johnson, Minister of State for Universities, Science, Research and Innovation.
The science behind Leaf Systems was developed, with BBSRC investment, at the John Innes Centre and its creators, Professor [Continue reading»]

Norwich scientists win international award in bid to solve antibiotic resistance

Norwich Research Park scientists have won a prestigious international award for a breakthrough that could help the fight against antibiotic resistance.
Prof David Russell from University of East Anglia’s School of Chemistry, in collaboration with Prof Rob Field from the John Innes Centre, were recognised for their method of performing a rapid diagnostic test to [Continue reading»]


These pages will hold documents relating to IBA activities such as methods and databases.  These will only be accessible to NRP science partners.


Earlham institute
Quadram Institute Bioscience
John Innes Centre
The Sainsbury Laboratory
NHS NNUH
University of East Anglia

© Norwich Research Park Science 2017. All rights reserved